What do you value in a community newspaper?

Isaac Kavenaugh note taking Nov 29. Karli Zschogner

Thursday November 29th, 2018

By Isaac Kavanaugh

Today Naotkamegwanning Mazina’igan’s current team, Karli Zschogner, Ian Crow, Damon Hunter hosted a resource meeting at Wiisinin Cafe. With a free lunch provided by Zschogner, everyone was welcome to attend to give their thoughts and ideas on how the newspaper is important and how it has value.

Invites were sent out by emails, poster copies, and public invites on social media.

The nine attendees, four of which were representing different organizations, the Naotkamegwanning EMS, Ontario Works, and Baibombeh School.

They discussed there was value in regular organization sponsorships and advertisements to help cover the costs of printing and towards future honorariums to regular contributors.

Noatkamegwanning Mazina’igan is independent and relies on voluntary work of community storytelling through writing and photography. The journalism trainer is here till March to provide training and is looking for more community support to make it last for years to come.

From the first issue the average cost to print was $2.30 per copy which the school has offered to let print for now.

During the discussion the attendees talked about preserving traditional protocol as a valued aspect for for the paper’s vision statement.

Roland White said he would like to see more community input to have a page dedicated to Naotkamegwanning own history, culture, and language teachings.

It was discussed that the community newspaper has an important role because it helps inform, showcase, and regional communication. It was also discussed as a regular paper it would help create an independent accessible space to showcase facts, achievements, experiences, and concerns within the surrounding region.

Zschogner explained the importance of knowing the difference between news, opinion and advertising:

News – contains factual information reported by journalists. If they are responsible, well-trained journalists, they would have done research, verified facts, revealed the sources of their information and identified statements of opinion from those sources.

Advertising – minimal context of event or product, not independently verified or fact-checked, some legal or policy exceptions, advertisements can say pretty much whatever they want to.

Opinion – meant to supplement the news portion and provide for an exchange of ideas.

There are two types: 1) Editorial – statements made on behalf of the newspaper itself; 2) Op-ed – guest columnists or submitted opinion pieces

Tips for noticing: 1) The page or piece is labeled with words like: opinion, editorial, reporter’s notebook, review or analysis 2) The text makes first-person statements like “I” and may follow it up with “believe” or “think” 3) The tone is more personal, maybe with some sarcasm, exaggerations or personal anecdotes.

The next print date is December 13 with a Christmas and holiday theme of storytelling. The deadline for story ideas and submission is December 8.

Advertisements

Snap, Crackle, Pop! Wild Rice Harvesting at Cultural Camp at Whitefish Bay

Elders and youth come together for a three-day cultural knowledge sharing camp at Naotkamegwanning Roundhouse

JasmineCopenance13Gr3
Kelly Kavanaugh watches a child stir wild rice (Photo Credit: Jazlyn Copenace)

By: Carter Nash, West Ranville, Jaryn Joseph, Arianna Jack

The sound of drumming, the smell of smoke, the scraping of rock, and the popping of wild rice were sights and sounds of pride at the Naotkamegwanning roundhouse.

Dylan Jennings was one of many cultural trainers parching or harvesting  wild rice at the first annual Shawendaasowin Cultural Camp held on October 23-25, 2018.

VirginiaLoon-Jennings
Dylan Jennings makes a traditional handheld drum (Photo Credit: Virginia Loon)

Jennings, or Maskode Bizhikiins, (Little Buffalo) of  Bad River Band of Lake Superior says he started harvesting as a young person.  “I was probably 10 or 11 when I went out harvesting with my cousin,” he explained.  His grandma, aunties and uncles taught him how to harvest manoomin.

Virginia Loon
Youth stirring wild rice (Photo Credit: Virginia Loon)

As part of his identity as Anishinaabe, he said, “Harvesting connects everything in creation.”   He remembers important virtues such as patience, respect and love.

“Harvesting wild rice is a lot of work, but necessary,” said Jennings.  “It makes us hard and honest workers when we remember how to do things the old way. It also helps to keep us grounded and humble.”

Jazlyn Copenance
Karli Zschogner, journalism trainer stirring wild rice (Photo Credit: Jazlyn Copenance)

Jennings said he enjoyed the dialogue between the young people and elders. “It was invaluable to hear the experiences of the elders and the way they used to harvest and live.”

He said he enjoyed being in the community and sharing his knowledge. He was happy that Shawendaasowin invited him.  “The community is truly blessed with so many great teachers, young people and knowledgeable elders,” said Jennings.

1st- Oct23-25 Cultural Camp - Virginia Loon
Elder Evelyn Tom scraping deer hide (Photo Credit: Virginia Loon)

The cultural camp involved people from in and out of the community, including students from Kenora’s Beaver Brae Secondary School.

Other cultural workshop activities included community art, tikinagan baby carrier making, deer harvesting and hide scraping, ribbon skirt making and soapstone carving. Daily feasts followed.  A traditional powwow closed the event.

BraydenNash5
Young participants take part in soapstone carving (Photo Credit: Brayden Nash)

Carmen Bird, or Giizhibabenacesiik of the Sturgeon Clan, is Director of Services for Shawendaasowin Child and Family Services. “We don’t usually see cultural activity event opportunities in our community, so this is one of the things we were able to bring forward because of funding that we have received,” she said.

OceanTom9
The smiles of generations with Carmen Bird (right) (Photo Credit: Ocean Sky Tom)

The idea for this cultural camp came from the Jordan’s Principle Initiative. Jordan River Anderson was a young Cree boy from Norway House, Manitoba who didn’t get the service that he required and he had to be away from home to receive medical care.  He had to stay in a hospital, and while there, he passed away while the provincial and federal governments argued over who should take responsibility for his costs and didn’t speed up any process for him to be at home where he should have been.

Scraping deer hide (Photo Credit: Jazlyn Copenance)
Scraping deer hide (Photo Credit: Jazlyn Copenance)

Funding from Jordan’s Principle is to provide students, youth and children access to required services at home. The cultural camp fell into this category.

Bird believes it is important to retain cultural teachings and traditions from elders within the community.  “We can come together once in a while with educators, our skilled people, the ones who have talents, our organizations and our elders.”

She said Shawendaasowin plans to host future cultural camps.

Roland White
Cultural Camp Pow Wow (Photo Credit: Roland White)

More Than Just a Skating Rink: Altruistic Peers Strive for Change

DamonHunter2
(Left to right) Everett Cowley, Clement Gustafson, Mary-Anne Mooring, Glen White (Photo Credit: Damon Hunter)

Fellow workers make efforts towards a better future for youth

By: Damon Hunter

Thursday,  November 15th was the official opening of the 2018-2019 season of skating at Naotkamegwanning’s Chi Key Wis Arena. It brought smiles, not just to skaters, but also to the people that made it possible.

Damon Hunter 6
Local skaters participate in an open-skate held at the arena (Photo Credit: Damon Hunter)

Since the major reconstruction of the Chi Key Wis Arena four years ago, Mary-Anne Mooring has been the woman behind the scenes helping to make it happen.

Mooring is a longtime Power Engineer, with three decades of experience, including Chief Engineer at the old Winnipeg Arena which housed the Jets and Winnipeg Moose, and Assistant Chief Engineer at the University of Manitoba. She was also responsible for overhauling Kenora Recreational Centre and making their ice.

Mechanical work was what she specialized in for the most part. “I took care of all the physical plans,” she stated.

She expressed gratitude for her fellow workers Glen White, Everett Cowley, and CJ Gustafson. Without the band and council’s financial and motivational support, no such progress would be made, she explained.

Mooring says she is grateful for her partner Denise Lysak who writes some of the grants for Naotkamegwanning projects alongside her.

Everett Cowley is one of the first arena workers, employed there since day one, ‘from where it was just a few light bulbs working and natural ice’.

Prior to his current position, he had already been working at the arena before major changes took place, including removal of mold. His current job, maintaining the Zamboni and ice, is a critical one. Cowley commented that so far there haven’t been many problems and with everyone’s work contributions, things have been running very smoothly.

He related that his main motivation is the kids. He remarked that his grandson is an influence as well, stating that he provides a major incentive to do what Cowley does day by day.

(Left to right) Everett Cowley, Clement Gustafson, Mary-Anne Mooring, Glen White (Left to right) Everett Cowley, Clement Gustafson, Mary-Anne Mooring, Glen White

DamonHunter4
(Photo Credit: Damon Hunter)

Together as a group, the workers have been largely responsible for most of the grander changes around Whitefish Bay. Locations such as the new beach, the baseball diamond, and the basketball court are some of the their accomplishments and there will soon be a new skate park along with a conjoined bicycle track.

The goal, Mooring says, is to give the youth a chance at finding what they enjoy and to have something fun to do in their free time.

“We’re about making things better, not just taking care of ourselves,” she says. “It’s about the community.”

Many more projects are aspired for, the biggest being a whole new training facility for young athletes. Wrestling, hockey, and lacrosse are the prime targets as of now. Beach volleyball and a new fitness centre are also very much wanted.

“I know there’ve been some great athletes that could’ve come out of Whitefish Bay and they never had the courage to be able to do what they should’ve done,” Mooring said. “To become those athletes, they need a network for support.”

The following article was also published in the Kenora Daily Miner – The Enterprise in print and online. Available here

A Safe Space to Grow

By Katherine Adams

Freeman White Jr has taken the opportunity to visit his home town of Whitefish Bay, this time working with Right to Play under Kenora Chiefs Advisory.

“I wish that I had this when I was a kid,” he said in an interview with Virginia Loon.

Right to Play was founded in 2000 by Olympic gold medalist Johann Olav Koss and has since grown worldwide. Right to Play serves 85 First Nation communities in Canada.

He said his goal is to provide a safe space to play and learn including sports, cooking classes and a place to do homework.

46503296_306181453322079_4329471087571107840_n
Freeman White Jr. participates in many sports activities, including baseball (Photo Credit: John White)

“I have hopes that Right to Play can inspire youth to achieve their wildest dreams, either through the programs or just by talking with the kids that are involved,” he said.

Currently he comes to the school to Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 3:30 to 5:30 pm. Starting in mid-January, he will be here on Saturdays to coordinate volleyball games with nearby reserves under the program.

He said he would like to deliver this program to ages 6-12, which is what the “After School Program” is designed for, but persons of all ages are welcome.

“I am aware that there are other programs that are being delivered to youth on a daily basis.  I would hope to collaborate with them and not compete,” he said.

He is here with the program for ten months from November 5th to August 31st.

An unexpected space of truth and reconciliation at Naotkamegwanning roundhouse

In recognition of Orange Shirt Day, Hockey Hall of Famer speaks at Indian Horse screening

By: Xavier Ranville and Wynter Taylor

It was a chilly last evening of September when Naotkamegwanning’s roundhouse was filled with more bodies than it has had in a long time – dedicated to residential school survivors.

The 40 plus community members and guests of all ages enjoyed traditional foods as wild rice and bannock before sitting down for the big screen and local George Kakeway’s similar story of residential school survival through hockey.

“Be who you are because that’s how you survive,” said Kakeway in discussion after the award-winning film adaption of the novel by the late Northwestern Ontario’s Anishinaabe Richard Wagamese.

Indian Horse, follows the fictional Anishinaabe character Saul, and his experience at residential school and his talent through hockey. The story captures many of the realities of racism and ill treatment Indigenous persons have faced.

Sept30IndianHorseGeorgeKakewayRoundHouse_Xavier_recording-WynterTaylor
Kakeway as the only Indigenous boy played hockey in Kenora, later attending Assiniboia Residential School with later Assembly of First Nations National Chief Phil Fontaine (Photo Credit: Wynter Taylor)

The film left many people in tears touched by the story, either seeing for the first time on screen the real experiences of their loved ones or because they had no idea of this part of Canada’s history and what they went through.

Like many adults and elders like Wauzhushk Onigum First Nation’s George Kakeway, the story of Saul and his peers was very much a reality.

“As a survivor it becomes very hard to express what we went through,” he said in the community discussion.

George was taken from his home in 1951 at the age of 6.  He talked about his time at St. Mary’s Catholic Residential School in Kenora, that his hair was cut bald and punished for speaking Ojibwe. He expressed that this place, along with its sanitarium, was one of the loneliest places.

“The intent was to assimilate us, not to educate us,” he said.

Like character Saul, he was an orphan at age 10, and hockey had come available for him and he excelled, not just out of interest but a method of survival from experiences.

Wynter Taylor - George Kakeway
George Kakeway said he would use hockey and other sports to get it out of your mind and survival. (Photo Credit: Wynter Taylor)

He said hockey gave him the opportunity to chose to go to Winnipeg’s Assiniboia Residential school which let him study and also gave him time to play hockey. His focus led him to become the chief at his home at the young age of 25.

In October of last year George and his team were inducted into Manitoba’s Hockey Hall of Fame.

September 30, Orange Shirt Day is not just the last day of the month but a national movement, and proposed national holiday of sharing residential school experiences. It remains a hard day for many elders to relive and share, taking courage.

Kakeway Indian Horse Screening Poster
Indian Horse Screening Poster (Photo Credit: Karli Zschogner)

While having heard about residential schools, Judi Cannon, a non-indigenous attendee, was overwhelmed to learn about what was going on inside and outside of the residential schools.

“I can’t even believe it would happen,” she said.  “I don’t understand how people could treat other people that way.”

Cannon, Director of Ontario SPCA for Partnerships and Community Outreach, along with her crew were invited into the community for their second year extraction of unaccounted for dogs.

Event was put on by the community’s journalism trainer and the community’s Women’s Shelter.

Noatkamewanning Hanisha Singers take a national stage in supporting families of missing and murdered

People of all ages shared a space of healing through a red jingle dress pow wow held in Winnipeg followed the five-day MMIW Inquiry.

By: Roland White

Families could feel the powerful shivers down their spine as Teddy Copenace solo lamenting song to missing and murdered indigenous women. The Red Jingle Dress pow wow, dedicated to the tragic missing and murdered women and men, was held at Winnipeg’s Lavallee School October 6.

“In’de dabajiitoon gi-nagamowan. (I sing from the heart.) Niminwendan apane gi-nagamowan owe nagamon (I feel good every time I sing this song.)”, says Copenace.

Teddy and Leslie Copenance an Tommy Hunter
Teddy Copenace, Leslie Copenace and Tommy Hunter (Photo Credit: Roland White)

Copenace says him and the rest of the Hanisha Singers volunteered to come to this event to help honour and support families in the healing process.

He describes the particular song, “Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women” on the groups titled album ‘Remembering & Honouring Our Lost and Stolen Sisters’ before he sings. Woke up crying, he says it came to him as a dream of a girl who was in distress and trying to reach out to him but he was unable to help her.

Jingle Dress Dancers
Red Jingle Dress Dancers (Photo Credit: Karli Zschogner)

He explains his wife told him to go outside a make a fire and put tobacco down. While outside, the wind blew and he heard a voice say, “ogimaa- ikwe.” Afterwards he put down tobacco, he heard the leaves rustling like jingles and a voice saying again, “ Okijiichidaa-ikwe  was the one you were dreaming of.”

Desirae Paypompee was one of the red jingle dress dancers that came to participate in the pow-wow. Currently living in Winnipeg, she is originally from Naotkamegwannng First Nation.

Desirae Paypompee
Desirae Paypompee, originally from Naotkamegwanning First Nation, joined as a jingle dress dancer and the Winnipeg pow wow. (Photo Credit: Karli Zschogner)

She says it was a pleasant surprise to see her community members partake in the event.

“It was very healing,” she says. “It made me feel apart of something big.”

She says she feels responsible for educating her son about respect. She says she believes that like the Orange Shirt Day movement, youth and adults should be educated about this horror.

“I do have relatives who have lost their loved ones and I also have friends within the city who have lost loved ones also,” she says.

Jingles Dress Dancers - Roland White
Jingle Dress Dancers dance to help heal the pain (Photo Credit: Roland White)

The organizers including Walking Little Bear Candace Arrow expressed gratitude to the Hanisha Singers for dedicating their time and energy in attending the MMIW pow-wow.

She says she started planning this event in February for a space for healing and unity for the affected families. She says the process ended up something much more.

“It kept me clean, it kept me driven and kept me focused” says Arrow.

Organizer Candace Arrow watching female drum group
Organizer Walking Little Bear Candace Arrow watches female drum group (Photo Credit: Roland White)

She says has experienced both sides, being a supporter for children and youth at Red River College, and as a victim and survivor.

“I was nearly taken. I was 14. I was lured by alcohol and the man took me to the river,” she says. “Who knows what he could of done with me. I jumped out of the moving car.”

She was getting very emotional and teary eyed.

She says out of principle, she kept her budget costs below the small missing persons rewards offered for finding missing indigenous girls.

She says she was overwhelmed by the large turn out, raffle and food contributions and considers having it next year.

“If I do have it next year, it’s going to be in every province,” she laughs.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fwhiterol%2Fvideos%2F2112036925507566%2F&show_text=0&width=560

Naotkamegwanning youth learn respect to wildlife

KelsiB. Carter Nash cutting up meat
Carter Nash cutting up meat (Photo Credit: Kelsi Blackhawk)

By: Ocean Sky Tom

Students at Baibombeh Anishinaabe School got their hands all bloody last Thursday October 4 .

For Grade 7 and 8 Ojibwe language and land –based classes they were invited to Shawendaasowin Prevention Services to learn how to harvest a deer.

Students took turns sawing, slicing, cutting, and washing the meat. Alongside this, they were listening to cultural teachings and documenting with microphones, cameras and video cameras with the Naotkamegwanning’s community journalism trainer Karli Zschogner.

Teddy Copenace, the elementary land-based coordinator, guided them through the process, explaining the sacredness of the deer.

Kelsi Blackhawk photo credit
Student West Ranville jumps in to document audio and video as others take turns slicing deer meat, listening to teachings of Teddy Copenace (Photo Credit: Kelsi Blackhawk)

“The main protocols that I did was that we put tobacco down before we started cutting this deer up,” he said speaking to interviewer West Ranville. “This is someone’s clan and on top of that, the Creator is the one who gave us that deer for us to survive.”

He describes how the hooves are used for pow wow regalia, use the he use the hide as a drum, for moccasins, and a jacket to keep as warm

He also explains that out of respect for the animal, the skull and antlers are left with an offering of tobacco.

Teddy and West Photo Credit-Ocean Tom
Student West Ranville jumps in to document audio and video as others take turns slicing deer meat, listening to teachings of Teddy Copenace (Photo Credit: Kelsi Blackhawk)

Teacher Roland White says he was happy to students working with their hands.

“It’s part of our culture, it’s part of who who we are, to learn about animals,” he said.

Kelsi Blackhawk
Baibombeh students take turns cutting up deer meat and documenting (Photo Credit: Kelsi Blackhawk)

Lester Kavanaugh, the Senior Prevention Worker at Shawendaasowin Prevention Services hosted the space.  He says he got the deer after requesting community hunters to donate wild game.

“I am planning on doing is feeding the students at least once or twice a month hot lunch,” he said.

When interviewed, Sharia Yomi of Grade 12 said she would definitely do this again.

“It was a good experience,” she said. “So that our young know how to skin deer and know the teachings of our animals and spirits.”