Ice Fishing for Beginners

By: Calvin Joseph

 Ice fishing is one of many ways to enjoy the great outdoors during the winter months.  Let’s face it, winter is and will always be part of our life for five months out of the year.  In years past, we’ve enjoyed mild winters and have also had to contend with this thing they call the Polar Vortex – Yigh!

One of many ways I like to enjoy the outdoors is to go ice fishing on the many lakes that are within our area.  There are so many ways to do this and still enjoy it to the fullest. Whether it is renting an ice shack for the day or using a portable ice hut, we can still enjoy the outdoors with the comforts of heat, especially during those cold days on the lake.

 There are so many products on the market today that can make the day that much more enjoyable.  Sometimes it can be overwhelming on shopping for such items, especially with all that they have on the market.  For the beginner ice fishermen, there are certain tools and supplies that you will need to get started. Here are some of the essentials that you will most likely need:

 

  1. Ice Fishing Rod/Reel Combo – A spinning outfit is probably the way to go, a medium 26 – 28” rod spooled with 8lb. test fishing line.  This set up is ideal because it is versatile in a sense that you can catch the smallest Crappie to catching Walleyes and the fair sized Lake Trout that are abundant on the beautiful Lake of the Woods.

 

  1.      Manual Auger – I started out with a Bologna powered Auger, which is fine nowadays.  They make them so well and so sharp without having to dish out loads of money for a gas powered or even electric powered auger.  A manual auger is an inexpensive item that is essential to this sport. A 6” to 8“ auger is ideal because it is a practical size for pulling pan sized fish to trophy sized fish through the hole.  You can find these at the local sporting goods store anywhere from $40 – $100.

 

  1.      Tackle – There are so many options out there that it becomes overwhelming in making the right purchase.  I will break it down based on the three main sought after fish that can be caught on this lake:

Walleye – ¼ oz. Jig with any type of colour choice tipped with a live minnow; good for  shallow or deep water fishing.  A bright coloured Jigging Spoon ¼ oz. to 3/8 oz. tipped with a Minnow Head based on preference and water depth.   You will mostly find these fish in 20 to 40 feet of water. Straight to the bottom is the way to go.

Crappie – 1/16 oz. Coloured Jig tipped with a live minnow or a micro tungsten coloured jig tipped with a live or plastic 2” mimic minnow.  You can also use smaller jigging spoons as well. These fish can be found in back bays finding the deepest bowl of the bay in 10 – 30 feet of water.

Trout – A silver or gold coloured Spoon sized ¼ oz to 3/8 oz. is ideal, these fish are found in deeper water so it is a must to fish heavier type tackle.  A white or pearl coloured plastic tube bait with a ¼ oz. to ½ oz. jig is an absolute must in trying to catch a Lake Trout, these fish are often fooled by this particular hook because of its erratic movement in the water column.  These fish can be found in 20 to 100 feet of water, they suspend so they can be caught throughout all depths of the water column.

    

  1. Ice Hut – This is optional, of course!  If you plan on enjoying the heat of a portable heater or bringing kids to this adventure, then it is always good to have a portable ice hut.  Whether it is a place to warm up or fish stationary, the luxury of heat on those particular days makes the day much more enjoyable for you, the wife and the kids.  Try to go as big as your budget can go. A 3-4 person ice hut is size enough for your gear and visitors.

 

  1.      Be Safe – Always let others know where you’ll be fishing and what time you’ll be back.  There are areas out there that are unsafe for fishing. Tag along with someone who knows the lake and you’ll find out right quick the knowledge to understand the importance of being safe on the ice.  Don’t hesitate to ask questions about the lake, they have apps that you can purchase on the smartphone – Navionics and Lakemaster are the ones primarily used in our area that will show the contours and depths of our lake and where you can locate some of the target species.

 

February 18, 2019 is Family Day, the community will often host a family Fish Derby during this day; they usually have awesome prizes and categories to the winners so be on the lookout for posters as this is a family affair. Try your luck and I’ll guarantee you will have fun doing so.  Good luck, be safe and good fishing.

Calvin Joseph is currently the guidance counsellor at Baibombeh Anishinaabe School.

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Mentorship is the Key to Learning and Growing

By: Isaac Kavanaugh

Isaac Kavanaugh 14
Roland White drafts ideas for the group (Photo credit: Isaac Kavanaugh)

Earlier this month I attended a conference dedicated to youth of treaty three dedicated to the importance of mentorship in college or university.

Six of us high school students from Whitefish Bay attended the Grand Council Treaty Three youth mentorship conference held in Fort Frances at the La Place Rendezvous Hotel on January 11 and 12.

One of the things that stuck out to me was a presentation by Dr. James Makokis from Saddle Lake First Nation. He introduced himself in his language which is Little Boy Drum (Anishanabe name). He talked about his Cree background and how the Ojibway and Cree culture and language are similar, just taught differently and how the language is said. He also talked about the Alberta Jasper Park mountains and how you can see the marks left from the Creator and the great Nana Boozhoo.

Uniquely, Carol Easton the Fort Frances Tribal Health Unit gave a presentation about sexual education. During the presentation they talked about how to get tested and how the Sexual Transmitted Infections (STIs) are all different, how they affect the body, and how to receive treatment.

The next presentation was about human trafficking and how this sexual exploitation is happening around us. Speaking about trauma and survivors, they explained how one can recover from such a monstrous act with the help of support workers and seeking help. They explained that the main spots for human trafficking takes place in Fort Frances ON and Thunder Bay ON.

They did a demonstration on how young girls get caught by the traffickers. To explain, she set up a profile of a little girl (aged thirteen plus) and within twenty minutes that profile she made as an example got 35 friend requests on Facebook from older men, she also said that traffickers will use language like “I can help pay your bills”.

On the final day, they asked us to write down our insights and how we felt. Asking what we would like to see at the next conferences, many of us across the different nations said language and culture. When asked to share from our table, many of my peers asked if I would speak but I told them that I cannot always be responsible for them but to speak for themselves – that they have their own voice and experiences.

Isaac Kavanaugh 19
Corban Crow speaks for his table (Photo credit: Isaac Kavanaugh)

Corban spoke of our table’s suggestions on the next conference locations including Kenora and Winnipeg. Baibombeh teacher Roland White spoke saying he was happy to see youth engage in wanting to see more native language. He also recommended that the next time youth be split up so that they can meet each other better.

Isaac Kavanaugh is a Grade 11 student at Baibombeh Anishinaabe School.

Community Events – Feb 1 –March 22 -Issue 4 – January 31

Fri Feb 1 – Sun Feb 3 | ChiKeyWis Classic Mens Open Hockey Tournament | Daily Admission $5 | Team Entry $400 | Local Artisan Booths

Thurs Feb 7 | Abuse Fair | Kenora Chiefs Advisory Violence Prevention Program | Naotkamegwanning Health Centre, Healing Room | Contact: biancafvpp@gmail.com | (807) 226-2605 | 11am

Mon Feb 11 | Human Trafficking Workshop | Hosted by Family Violence Prevention Program | Naotkamegwanning Health Center, Healing Room | Contact: biancafvpp@gmail.com (807) 226-2605 | 11am

Mon-Wed Feb 11-13 | First Aid & CPR/AED Level C Course | Naotkamegwanning EMS Ambulance Base | Instructor Gabe Barnes. 1-778-686-8379 or gabebarnes751@gmail.com |
$130.00 per person (cash or EMT) | 9 am -4:30 pm, with a half hour for lunch

Wed Feb 13 | Animkii Judo Club Belt Testing Night | NWA37 Complex | 6pm Wednesdays || Sensei is David Lindsay | Membership fees are $50 per month | Contacts: kurtismedecine@gmail.com, niigaan@gmail.com, bonitakavanaugh@gmail.com

Fri Feb 15 | Shoal Lake Hawks Open Mens & Womens Hockey Tournament | (FB)

Mon Feb 18 | Family Day Pow-Wow | Hosted By Family Prevention Program/ Shawendaasowin Child And Family Services/ Jordan’s Principal | Baibombeh School Gymnasium | 1pm – 7pm

Sat Feb 23 | Lobstick Bay Ice Fishing Derby | Whitefish Bay Ice Road | Proceeds go to Jazzy Copenace Jr. Girls Jingle Dress Special “Honouring Children Lost in Residential School” @ May 20th | $50/team of 2 persons | 5 places | prizes based on # of entries | Contact Jyles or Jolene @ 807-407-5407 |11am-4pm

Thurs/Fri Feb 21 Feb 22 | Human Trafficking Awareness Event | Wauzhausk Onigum Golden Eagle Casino | 8:00am – 5:00pm | LeanneR@metisnation.org/Shawnda.peck@kenorachiefs.ca

Mon – Fri March 18-22 | Trapping/Harvesting Course | Trainer Kaaren Dannenmann | Hosted by Shawendaasowin Prevention Services | Limited to 15 people, Ages 16 + | Call to register 226-5172 | Conference Room, Chi Key Wis Arena | 9am-4pm

“You need your own space,” says Naotkamegwanning arena manager about upcoming skateboard park

Mary Ann Mooring asks Sagaate Ranville’s questions at Baibombeh School. (Photo Credit:West Ranville)

By Connor Kakeeway

While plans of a proposed skatepark have been available for few months, this past Tuesday January 28, Naotkamegwanning project and arena manager Mary Ann Mooring hosted an open forum at Baibombeh Anishinabe School.

“All this is coming from the voice of youth,” said Principal Eric Wilson who introduced the two guest. The presentation was split into two group, grade 7-12 and 4-6 and had been announced as a  public event of the community’s local Facebook page.

Mary Ann, who is an electrical engineer by trade and maintained many sports centres including the Kenora Recreation Centre, spoke with her partner Alex Man, a geological engineer and trail designer for Scatliff + Miller + Murray.

“You need you own space,” said the arena manager about the upcoming skatepark.

Engineer Alex Man presents the park plans (Photo Credit: West Ranville)

She said the idea and planning initially started in spring of 2018 and that she has since then worked with chief and council. She said she had approved the plans and layout. These plans included Ojibwe themes in the skatepark to be shaped as a snake and turtle.

Engineer Alex Man of Scatliff + Miller + Murray has also built a skateboard park in Wabigoon First Nation. (Photo Credit: Ian Crow)

In both groups, questions were asked on where they would find equipment. They both responded with the idea of getting the older youth to create a fundraising project and corporate sponsorship.

Alex Man is no stranger to skateboarding and working with first nation communities, being skateboarder himself and having created a skate park in Wabigoon First Nation  including making sure the youth were involved.

Baibombeh Anishinaabe School youth listen and ask questions about the skateboard park (Photo Credit: Ian Crow)

In the discussion about maintaining the space Alex also explained that the area should be maintained because rocks and dirt is hazardous to skateboarders. He also brought up bad versus good graffiti – bad meaning unplanned, gang related, and hateful. Good being planned, artistic, meaningful art. Mary Ann went on to suggest a contest on graffiti art that can be facilitated by local artists.

Jazlyn Copenace of grade four said she thinks it would be boring without colour, supporting colourful concrete consisting of the rainbow spectrum.

Mary Ann explained that this will be a good opportunity for more jobs in the community in maintaining the skatepark and the recreation centre which is now the Shawendaasowin Prevention office. Saying the location transition will be next winter, Mary Ann explains that the space could be rebranded to a new business such as a coffee/ice cream shop, with other recreational space such as pool or ping pong tables.  

Mary Ann said they are planning to start this May on the soil and be ready for July long weekend. The estimated cost is $385,000. She says the are currently waiting on a grant to cover $185,000 and are looking for corporate sponsors. Mary Ann and Alex are looking forward to community input to be forwarded to her at the arena next month.

Naotkamegwanning Arena and Project Manager Mary Ann Mooring and Engineer Alex Man at Baibombeh School (Photo Credit: West Ranville)

When asked if this area can be used by people who aren’t interested in sports, Mary Ann replied “You don’t have to care about sports, it’s about family gathering and building character”.

Whitefish Bay youth powerfully demonstrate musical skills and talents

 

Natalie Copenace Kelly - credit Karli Zschogner 2
Natalie Copenace-Kelly, 14 of nearby Onigaming First Nation, sings cover of “Beautiful Thing” by Grace Vanderwaal (Photo Credit: Karli Zschogner)

Live performances and movie screening at Netaawgonebiik Health Centre captivates audience.

By: Damon Hunter

The once quiet healing room of the Netaawgonebiik Health Centre had transformed into a flashing sequence of revolving lights and was cheerfully occupied by an applauding crowd this past Sunday, January 20.

“It was such a good show. I enjoyed it and I’m going to watch the show again,” said Leila Paypompee who brought along her children.“That film really inspired me. My perspective changed on music and history”.

The aforementioned show in question is Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World. The internationally award-winning film had garnered the attention of the community journalism trainer Karli Zschogner and willed her to initiate a screening here in Whitefish Bay, along with the opportunity to host a few debut performances from local musicians.

Teddy Copenace
Hanisha Singer Teddy Copenace performs opening drum songs to the audience of 30. (Photo Credit: Karli Zschogner)

Teddy Copenace of Naotkamegwanning’s Hanisha Singers elevated the room’s spirituality with his strong vocals and hide drum. Second to perform was Natalie Copenace-Kelly, 14. Utilizing her self-taught ukulele skills, she sang a powerful cover of “Beautiful Thing” by Grace Vanderwaal.

“[I] was hecka scared but I felt better afterwards,” said Natalie. “That’s why I like doing it, because I feel so much better after it.”

Following was Connor Kakeeway’s expertly played two piano performances, both of which were self-taught by the 17 year old multi-instrumentalist only three years ago he said. He played his pieces ‘The Wind Palace’ and ‘The Night Before July’. All musical performances had generated great applause from the crowd.

Connor Kakeeway - credit - Karli Zschogner
Connor Kakeeway performs one of his two original pieces ‘The Night Before July’ he says inspired by a Japanese exchange student. (Photo Credit: Karli Zschogner)

“I really enjoyed the talent of our young people. Showcasing talent and having a platform for them is definitely needed,” said Rhonda White, 7th grade teacher at Baibombeh School.

Rumble, named after the 1958 influential rock and roll anthem by Shawnee Link Wray, reveals the unrecognized Indigenous contribution to several genres of music across history. The influential lives of these people wowed viewers as their background was not commonly known trivia.

Simple folk music was soon electric guitars and thrashing whips of dyed hair. The film included the backgrounds of Jimi Hendrix, Ozzy Osbourne, Buffy Sainte-Marie, swing’s Mildred Bailey and The Black Eyed Peas’ Taboo.

“The movie was really interesting. I’m a big music lover,” said guitar playing Brody Allen of Onigaming First Nation. “[I] never knew how much influence indigenous peoples had on music.”

The final set of musical performances occurred subsequently to the film opening with Natalie and then Connor with a second original piece. Closing the evening was the debut of the 19 year old, Cayne Kakeeway. Accompanied by community member Glen White on guitar and Connor on keyboard organ, Cayne rapped his own composition of self-written lyrics.

Cayne Connor Kakeeway Glen White
Naotkamegwanning community member Cayne Kakeeway debuts his first original rap and mixed beats supported by brother Connor Kakeeway on organ and Glen White on bass. (Photo Credit: Karli Zschogner)

The event had been brought to the attention of renowned guitarist, Stevie Salas. Salas has worked among the more larger bands of the rock genre, most notably Hardware. He has also collaborated with music giants such as Justin Timberlake, Mick Jagger, and Rod Stewart.

Both Salas and Tim Johnson, Executive Producers of the film, agreed to answer community gathered questions following the event through Naotkamegwanning Mazina’igan. These will be answered in our next issue.

London! Paris! Rome! The Baibombeh Anishinabe High School Travel Club

Travel Club members Adam Skead and Ireland Bird with her mother Leigh Green at first fundraiser Bingo December 10, 2018 at Baibombeh Aninishinaabe School Gym (Photo Credit: Xavier Ranville)

By: Marietta Patabon

The Baibombeh Anishinabe High School Travel Club is open to students enrolled in grades nine through 12. In May 2019, a group of 10 – 12 students and four chaperones will take a nine-day educational tour of three of the oldest cities in the world: London, England; Paris; France, and Rome, Italy! The tour was set up through EF Educational Tours Inc. at www.eftours.ca with expert travel consultants & tour guides that help every step of the way. Each student is currently working on fundraising ideas to help cover the full cost of their travel expenses.

As of January 2019, students should have already made two payments and are still fundraising in order to reach their goal. All students are currently working on their passport applications to ensure that they are prepared to travel.

Bingo Dabbers at Travel Club’s First Fundraiser Bingo December 10, 2018 at Baibombeh Aninishinaabe School Gym (Photo Credit: Elena Kejick)

To date, the travel club will already have hosted two merchandise bingo’s as well as one Christmas raffle. The first bingo was held on December 10th, 2018 and raised a total of $700. The second bingo was held on January 13th, 2019. This bingo did not get the turnout the club had hoped for. However, the bingo carried on without any profit gain. The Christmas Raffle gained a total of $2,066. Students and families have also taken to individual hockey pool’s, and mini draw’s.

Travel Club’s First Fundraiser Bingo December 10, 2018 at Baibombeh Aninishinaabe School Gym with food canteen (Photo Credit: Elena Kejick)

Here are some upcoming events the Travel Club will be hosting:

Merchandise Bingo, Monday, February 11, 2019 at Baibombeh School. Doors will open 6:30 p.m. Stay tuned for the Poster and list of Prizes. An announcement will be made soon for the next BIG Raffle with excellent prizes and where to purchase your tickets. Another fundraiser for the club is a cute one, candy gram sales at Baibombeh School for Valentine’s Day, orders can be made at the school. Lastly, the travel club will be at the Family Day Pow Wow, a canteen and a menu will be posted via Facebook.

Miigwetch for all your kind donations and support towards our Baibombeh Anishinabe High School students. 

Let it Snow! Winter/Holiday Photo Contest Judging

By: Karli Zschogner, Community Journalism Trainer, Journalists for Human Rights

let it snow! photo contest
(Photo Credit: Karli Zschogner)

Thank you to all who submitted content for past and current photo contests. The overall hope and goal is to encourage appreciation for one’s own creative eye and mind or to be the first to capture that split-second moment as a type of storytelling. Not only can you take pride in your work, but know that you can make earnings off of your work. Photojournalism is a thriving contribution. Just consider The Atlantic’s “Hopeful Images from 2018” or Time Magzine’s 2017 Best Photojournalism.
More locally, there is the power of Nadya Kwandibens, Anishinaabe from the Animakee Wa Zhing #37 First Nation in Northwestern Ontario. As Red Works, she has been featured in Photographers Without Borders under the Indigenous Rising portrait series.
For Let It Snow! Winter/Holiday Photo Contest showcased in December’s Naotkamegwanning Mazina’igan’s third issue, I have taken into consideration many factors including the adherence to the theme and instructions of submitting with a caption or photo essay. creatively, and the use of the rule-of-thirds.
The diversity of submissions evoking the full range of emotions: happiness, joy, peace, gratitude, and sadness, resulted in a very difficult challenge with the 14 photos submitted. So much so, that I increased the number of winner prizes. It became especially difficult when it came to respecting the baseline of following criteria of providing descriptions.
Congratulations to everyone who has submitted! Very big step! Chi Miigwetch for this opportunity!

kiara lynn bird
First Place Winner of December’s Let It Snow Photo Contest of Sunrise on Naotkamegwanning Mazina’igan Cover (Photo Credit: Kiara Lynn Bird)

1st ($100)Kiara Lynn Bird – This photo was taken as the sun was coming up during a winter morning. This tree has been around since my grandparents have lived in this exact spot; it reminds me they are never too far. Grateful for this season and even more grateful for the beauty that surrounds Naotkamegwanning.”

  • Shadow/silhouette
  • Creativity
  • Timing
  • Detail/Focus
  • Rule-of-thirds

2nd ($50) – Ozawaa Paypompee – “Throwing snow. There is happiness in snow when you go outside and embrace the snow. The outdoors are freedom.”

ozaawaa paypompee 2
Second Place Winner of December’s Let It Snow Photo Contest – “Throwing snow. There is happiness in snow when you go outside and embrace the snow. The outdoors are freedom.” (Photo Credit: Ozawaa Paypompee)
  • Timing/Movement
  • Rule-of-thirds
  • Inspirational Power

3rd ($25) – Cayne Kakeeway – “A beautiful sunset on the snow laden hills of Whitefish”

cayne kakeeway - a beautiful sunset on the snow laden hills of whitefish
Third Place winner for December’s Let It Snow Contest: “A beautiful sunset on the snow laden hills of Whitefish.” (Photo Credit: Cayne Kakeeway)
  • Colour Contrast
  • Timing
  • Clarity
  • Lines

4th ($15)Damon Hunter – “A stretch of burnt handrail from a house fire’s remains”

damonhunter - a stretch of burned handrail from a house fire's remains
Fourth Place Winner of December’s Let It Snow Photo Contest – “A stretch of burnt handrail from a house fire’s remains” (Photo Credit: Damon Hunter)
  • Rule-of-thirds
  • Clarity, Detail and Focus
  • Creativity/Lines
  • Newsworthiness
  • Current/Potential Social Impact

Notable Mention:
Caidy Indian – (December Baibombeh Pow Wow – smiles) No caption

caidy indian19
Notable Mention of December’s Let It Snow Photo Contest at December Baibombeh School (Photo Credit: Caidy Indian)
  • Inspirational Power
  • Timing/Movement/Action
  • Rule-of-thirds

Honorary Mention:
Maria Blackhawk – “Frozen Lakes, Ice Roads, and Unique Opportunities” with Essay with photos (See Naotkamegwanning Mazina’igan Link)

maria blackhawk - ice roads 3
Honorary Mention of December’s Let It Snow Photo Contest : Wolf Running : “Frozen Lakes, Ice Roads, and Unique Opportunities” (Photo Credit: Maria Blackhawk)
  • Creativity
  • Timing, uniqueness, rarity
  • Clarity
  • Reflection
  • Rule-of-thirds