Photo Essay: Frozen Lakes, Ice Roads, and Unique Opportunities

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Honorary Mention of December’s Let It Snow Photo Contest : Sunset : “Frozen Lakes, Ice Roads, and Unique Opportunities” (Photo Credit: Maria Blackhawk)

By: Maria Blackhawk

We are so fortunate to have ready access to area lakes and rivers, especially in winter. We can travel off the highways and on to any of several ice roads. These roads weave their way over and around the islands and shorelines. Your chances of seeing something noteworthy is high.

We live in the digital age, connected by cell phones with the ability to take high resolution photos and videos. There are so many breathtaking images to capture from our everyday surroundings. There is nothing more relaxing than stopping for a moment to take in the scenery and make some observations that would be impossible without the access that ice roads provide.

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Honorary Mention of December’s Let It Snow Photo Contest : Wolf Running : “Frozen Lakes, Ice Roads, and Unique Opportunities” (Photo Credit: Maria Blackhawk)

It’s a time to reflect on creation and your place in it. It’s a time to be humble and realize that you are not the center of the universe. You are part of something bigger and more important. It’s a time to be grateful that you are here, at this moment, able to appreciate what many take for granted.

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Honorary Mention of December’s Let It Snow Photo Contest : Wolf Running at night: “Frozen Lakes, Ice Roads, and Unique Opportunities” (Photo Credit: Maria Blackhawk)

If you are lucky you may come upon wildlife in its natural habitat. You may find yourself really close to wildlife and feel the excitement of a once-in-a-lifetime, close encounter.

There is great satisfaction in capturing a moment in time that you can share with loved ones. Especially when they share in your excitement and awe. I’ve learned to appreciate the everyday routine travels that can become a spectacular event at any moment.

Maria Blackhawk’s photo essay received Honourary Mention in December’s Let It Snow Photo Contest.

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Coding makes the world go round, and the games you play

By: Imran Ali

Baibombeh Anishinabe School is pleased to inform our students that we have planned to launch a ‘Coding Club’. Living in an era of space, technology and online entertainment and communication, we are in a competitive, ability-centric world. Across the world, children are learning to code in elementary school.

There are some misconceptions or fears related to coding. For example, that you need pre-requisite courses, that it is very complicated/technical, that it is for math experts, or that it is very expensive to learn.

In this day and age, coding is an important skill that must be acquired during our initial years of learning. In fact, coding is just like learning a language. More specifically, it is knowing and understanding how to say something in different ways – the logic.

Anyone who has some interest and is a bit devoted, can learn it easily. All you need is your computer, Internet and the 3D’s: Desire, Decision and Devotion and the world is yours!

There are many advantages of learning how to ‘code.’ It’s a world full of job opportunities, being self-reliant and creative, and also provides an opportunity for self-employment, without leaving your home or community.

One can design games, develop your own Ojibway language software, build robotics and develop one’s own blogs and websites.

In short, technology has no limits. On your phones, computers and other gadgets, you are interacting with the whole world without leaving your home.

Learning basic code, you can prepare yourself and future generations by learning new skills and knowledge, as well as preserving culture, language and traditions.

What do you value in a community newspaper?

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Thursday November 29th, 2018

By Isaac Kavanaugh

Today Naotkamegwanning Mazina’igan’s current team, Karli Zschogner, Ian Crow, Damon Hunter hosted a resource meeting at Wiisinin Cafe. With a free lunch provided by Zschogner, everyone was welcome to attend to give their thoughts and ideas on how the newspaper is important and how it has value.

Invites were sent out by emails, poster copies, and public invites on social media.

The nine attendees, four of which were representing different organizations, the Naotkamegwanning EMS, Ontario Works, and Baibombeh School.

They discussed there was value in regular organization sponsorships and advertisements to help cover the costs of printing and towards future honorariums to regular contributors.

Noatkamegwanning Mazina’igan is independent and relies on voluntary work of community storytelling through writing and photography. The journalism trainer is here till March to provide training and is looking for more community support to make it last for years to come.

From the first issue the average cost to print was $2.30 per copy which the school has offered to let print for now.

During the discussion the attendees talked about preserving traditional protocol as a valued aspect for for the paper’s vision statement.

Roland White said he would like to see more community input to have a page dedicated to Naotkamegwanning own history, culture, and language teachings.

It was discussed that the community newspaper has an important role because it helps inform, showcase, and regional communication. It was also discussed as a regular paper it would help create an independent accessible space to showcase facts, achievements, experiences, and concerns within the surrounding region.

Zschogner explained the importance of knowing the difference between news, opinion and advertising:

News – contains factual information reported by journalists. If they are responsible, well-trained journalists, they would have done research, verified facts, revealed the sources of their information and identified statements of opinion from those sources.

Advertising – minimal context of event or product, not independently verified or fact-checked, some legal or policy exceptions, advertisements can say pretty much whatever they want to.

Opinion – meant to supplement the news portion and provide for an exchange of ideas.

There are two types: 1) Editorial – statements made on behalf of the newspaper itself; 2) Op-ed – guest columnists or submitted opinion pieces

Tips for noticing: 1) The page or piece is labeled with words like: opinion, editorial, reporter’s notebook, review or analysis 2) The text makes first-person statements like “I” and may follow it up with “believe” or “think” 3) The tone is more personal, maybe with some sarcasm, exaggerations or personal anecdotes.

The next print date is December 13 with a Christmas and holiday theme of storytelling. The deadline for story ideas and submission is December 8.

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

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Holly Paypompee of the Nataawgonebiik Health Centre displays some of her colleagues work (Photo Credit: Sandra Tom)

By Sandra Tom, Columnist

At a health fair with Kenora Chiefs Advisory/WNHAC Health to promote healthy living in the community, I came across this simple but understandable example. Now located in the waiting room of the Naotkamegwanning health clinic, I am showcasing just how much refined sugars in commonly consumed drinks. Refined or processed sugar, unlike natural sugars found in fruits are the largest factor for diabetes.

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic disease where the body can not properly store and use sugar that comes from food and beverages taken in.

How to prevent? Get tested once per year, whether or not you believe you are at risk.

Rethink before you drink:

Coke : 14 spoons

Gatorade: 11.5 spoons

Ice Tea: 10.5 spoons

Sunny D: 4 spoons

Vitamin water: 8 spoons

Red Bull: 7 spoons

What are the alternatives for other drinks: Water, infused fruit flavored water, teas without sugar, and an Anishinaabe twist – spruce tea.

Why is this important to me as a health care worker?

I’ve been a health worker for so many years and I’ve seen so many people go through amputation due to diabetes. It is why care to help the community to live a healthy lifestyle by promoting health related workshops. Our biggest community event is the Biggest Loser Challenge from May to August.

Sandra Tom is the Community Health Representative at Nataawgonebik Health Services.

Naotkamegwanning Ambulance Services

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Gabriel Barnes and Dean Smith pose outside of the Naotkamegwanning EMS building (Photo credit: Ozaawaa Paypompee)

By: Okima Paypompee

On October 15, Primary Care Paramedic Gabriel Barnes of Naotkamegwanning Ambulance gave Layla Monias, Arianna Jack, Angel Cowely, Ozaawaa Paypompee and I a tour.

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Inside the Ambulance (Photo Credit: Ozaawaa Paypompee)

He took the time to show us the ambulance truck sirens, turned on the lights for us, and showed us all the different types of equipment that is used to save lives.  This included a monitor to check the different heart beats.

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Paramedic Gabriel Barnes showing different heart monitor (Photo Credit: Ozaawaa Paypompee)

They have a competition to see who can raise the most for the community Toy & Food Drive.

Paramedic Gabriel Barnes (Photo Credit: Ozaawaa Paypompee)
Paramedic Gabriel Barnes (Photo Credit: Ozaawaa Paypompee)

There are currently 32 staff employed at the Naotkamegwanning Ambulance. They are open 24 hours. Call 911 in an emergency.

Baibombeh Updates and Stories – Issue 2, November 2018

Grade 4 Geography of Canada Poster Project

By: Michael Tokarz, Grade 4 Teacher

During the month of October, Grade 4 students completed a social studies unit on Canada. They learned about the different regions in Canada and completed a poster research project based on one province or territory in which they then presented to the rest of the class.

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Teagan Lowe and Jazlyn Copenace putting their poster on display (Photo credit: Michael Tokarz)

Sagaate Ranville completed his project on British Columbia. “I learned that British Columbia is the third largest province and the most westerly province in Canada,” he said.

I’m very proud of the effort they put forth into researching some of the basic facts of their province/territory.

 

Grade 5 Pumpkin Carving

By: Lillianna Taylor White

It was a gushy day in the Gr. 5 classroom on October 23rd as we carved out pumpkins. We used a big spoon, our hands and knives to remove the insides.

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A student displays the viscosity of a pumpkins interior (Photo Credit: Charlene White)

We were separated into groups because there were only four pumpkins.

The pumpkin was slimy inside. It was gross. Our teacher, Charlene White, asked Breanna and Cody to cut out the top for us.

There was a lot of pumpkin guts but we kept the seeds, washing them in water.

The seeds were going to be cooked, but that never happened because it was so busy. We were all over the place and our teachers were busy so we had to clean all by ourselves.

In an interview, Ms. White said the idea came from when she taught grade 4 a few years back. She says it was to see what pumpkin can offer us.

She said she was disappointed that we ran out of time that day and couldn’t roast the pumpkin seeds. “It would have been an opportunity to let them try it,” she said. “You can put flavor on pumpkin seeds like salt and vinegar or ketchup flavor.”      

We did do a draw to see who got to take the pumpkin home.

 

Halloween Costumes

By: Jerrah Chesson

On Halloween, the costumes were cool and scary at Baibombeh School, when participants met in the gym for a costume contest.

In grade 5, Lilli was Samara from The Ring, Charlie was Pennywise the dancing clown, Hayden and Dominika were skeleton figures. I was in a black suit with glowing glasses. We also watched a movie and it was really scary.

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Principal Eric Wilson and two teachers dress as pirates (Photo Credit: Caidy Indian)

“This year there was a zombie walk and I was one of the zombies,” said Dominika Oshie. “It was really awesome and really fun.”

 

Grade 6

The Emotionless Girl  

By Emma Tom Paypompee

Gr. 6

Raina is emotionless. She makes a lot of fake smiles.

She is 17 years old. She wants to make people happy so she pretends she has emotions.

When she was 13, people called her a freak because she was emotionless. When she was 15 she made four friends. Her friends would bully her and some didn’t want her to be her friend anymore. When she was about 16, she stopped acting that she had emotions. This made her parents sad.

She is 17 now – almost 18. She has a boyfriend now and he is kind. He teaches her two emotions, sadness and happiness. She told her parents and they are happy. She is happy. She is making new friends. She now has about six friends. Her boyfriend is happy that she has made a lot of friends. They teach her how to not be shy.

Her mother bought a house for her and her boyfriend. Her dad gave her money to buy food.

She is almost 19. When she is 19, she is going to look for a job.

She wants kids. She hopes her kids are not emotionless. She will try to teach her or him emotions.

Three years later, she is 21. Now she has a kid who is one year old. The kid is not emotionless, but she can read minds.

She is 30 and her kid is now nine. Her kids’ names are Kate, Jack and Sky. Kate is oldest, Jack is six, and Sky is two years old.

People call Kate a freak because she can read minds. Raina told her people called her a freak because she was emotionless.

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Emma’s original drawing

 

 

Gr. 6 Poetry

One Wish

By Virginia Loon

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Virginia’s original drawing

 

If I had one wish, I’d wish for thirst of knowledge unequaled by anything in my life.

Then I’d study, and nothing would stop me.

I’d learn French, German, Latin and Greek. I’d know a bit of Japanese and some Spanish, enough to get by.

I’d study molecular biology and physics, simply because they interest me.

I’d take judo, yoga, and taekwondo and the philosophies behind them.

I’d learn as much geography as I could but not the names: economics, industry, politics, religion.

I’d read about history, but not just the what and when, the who, the why, the how.

And no one would know. It would be me on my own, behind my jester’s mask.

I’d be happy.

 

The Story of Misuzu Sempai

By: Gwen Paypompee, Gr. 6

My name is Sempai-Chan. I am 17 years old.  I am known as the bookworm. My story is about my powers.  Funny, eh? No one really wanted to be friends with me just because of my powers.

My powers are mind-reading and I can actually read your mind!  I really hope we can be friends. I actually have blue hair, with bright green eyes.

Everyone at the Akademi has brown, blonde, black, any type of normal hair colors (unless if they dye their hair, it’s still normal) and normal eye colors too! Oh, did I tell you?  I’m half wolf! No, eh? Well, I really am half wolf!

I love it in the winter times, all the white snow, the cherry trees covered up in snow, so much more! But sadly, almost everyone at the Akademi bullies me. It became a bit physical ever since I got to middle school. Back in Italy I made friends. Now back here in Japan.

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Gwen’s original drawing

 

Make Sure Your Student Has Set a Goal

By: Ian Crow

First day of high school sets the path for all students. Registration isn’t just a day to sign up to attend. Registration could be the most important day for a student. When transitioning from junior high to high school, students have to have a goal in place. A student should be able to describe to the registration staff his or her learning objectives.

Starting school with a blank transcript only happens once. Grades have yet to be given. Grades given for each course at the end of the semester could have a positive or negative impact on a student’s career choice.

Perhaps a student enters into an elective in the third I am not sure what Ian means by the third semester semester and realizes, when it’s too late, that he or she is in the wrong course. They may find that they do not meet the criteria for entering their preferred program when they register for post-secondary programs. This is why it’s important for a student to know what they want to do in life.

When a student receives 30 consecutive credits in high school, he or she will have graduated “on-time”. These could be students who know what they want to do in life and have prepared themselves for further studies and ultimately a career.  

Students may, at times, decide to take a slow and steady path, stretching their time spent in school. There is nothing wrong with that, as long he or she is pondering life choices and are headed in the right direction. Students have until the age of 21 to graduate conventional school. Accelerated education is preferred amongst most educators, simply for quality of life purposes. Time spent in school should be kept at a minimum. Youth should experience more in life rather than staying in high school for an extended amount of time.

It is in the best interest of the student that they have a goal. Educators work well with students who have a plan. Deciding what work to assign and courses to offer is paramount to any educator.  To stray off a student’s chosen path would be a waste of everyone’s time and efforts.

Equipping a student with the necessary tools to continue his or her educational path is a priority for Baibombeh Anishinaabe School. We wish to provide confidence in their choices and inspire them to work hard on a regular basis.  We wish to open their minds and provide them guidance when it comes to choosing a path. A student’s journey begins with their aspirations. Doors are opening all the time. Students must grasp their dreams and work towards them.

 

Veteran George Crow

By Damon Hunter

For this year’s Remembrance Day, Cody Crow submitted photos and information about his father, George Crow. A poster hangs in the school in his honour. His father, George, was born on March 12, 1940 in Morson, Ontario.

At the age of 29, George signed up with the US Army. Stationed in Germany, he trained recruits to operate tanks. After the war he came back a hero. He was elected chief, and had also taken on the duties of councilor.

He enjoyed singing alongside the community country music club and was regarded as a talented artist.

 

Girls Wanted: 2018-2019 Curling Season has Begun

By: Sharia Yomi

We had our first curling practice on Tuesday, November 13th. Team members Danton Monias, Corban Crow, Connor Kakeeway, Drayston White and myself are trying out our first year in NORWOSSA Curling League.

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Members of the Curling Club await practice for this year’s league (Photo Credit: Roland White)

As for the rest of the team members, Ireland Bird, Xavier Ranville, and Adam Skead, this will be their third year in the League.

Our coaches, Brooke Swoffer and Jordan Marchand, have taught some of our new members how to slide with sliders. It was not easy at first, but the team got the hang of it.

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Members of the Curling Club warm up (Photo Credit: Roland White)

We only have two girls on our team. I suggest more girls or women should come on out and join our junior and senior curling teams.

 

Music Club 2018/2019

By: Mike Tokarz

Baibombeh Grade 4 Teacher/Music Coordinator

This school year, Baibombeh Anishinabe School is proud to be able to offer a musical program to our students. Through funding over the last couple of years, we were able to purchase a wide assortment of instruments, from trumpets, trombones, flutes, clarinets, alto saxophones, violins, guitars, drums, percussion, and keyboards.

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Jazlyn Copenace plays the saxophone (Photo Credit: Michael Tokarz)

The Grade 4 classroom is home to all of these instruments and they can often be heard in the afternoon from both ends of the school. The program is available to students from Grades 4 to 12. Students are currently working on learning to operate the instrument as well as proper posturing. We are also preparing for this year’s Christmas Concert.

I myself have played Alto Saxophone all my life and I look forward to passing on my knowledge of classical music to future generations and helping this program continue to grow and thrive in our school.

Jazlyn Copenace is working on learning how to play keyboard and alto saxophone in Music Club.  “Music Club is really fun. I’ve always wanted to learn how to play an instrument,” she said. “I hope to start a band in the future.”

All members of the community are welcome.

Music Club Weekly Schedule

Monday – Grade 4 Music Club – 12:20 to 12:50pm

Wednesday – Grade 5 Music Club – 12:20 to 12:50pm

Thursday – Grade 6 to 12 Music Club 12:20 to 12:50pm  – Grade 4 to 12 Music Club 3:30 to 4:30pm

 

Snap, Crackle, Pop! Wild Rice Harvesting at Cultural Camp at Whitefish Bay

Elders and youth come together for a three-day cultural knowledge sharing camp at Naotkamegwanning Roundhouse

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Kelly Kavanaugh watches a child stir wild rice (Photo Credit: Jazlyn Copenace)

By: Carter Nash, West Ranville, Jaryn Joseph, Arianna Jack

The sound of drumming, the smell of smoke, the scraping of rock, and the popping of wild rice were sights and sounds of pride at the Naotkamegwanning roundhouse.

Dylan Jennings was one of many cultural trainers parching or harvesting  wild rice at the first annual Shawendaasowin Cultural Camp held on October 23-25, 2018.

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Dylan Jennings makes a traditional handheld drum (Photo Credit: Virginia Loon)

Jennings, or Maskode Bizhikiins, (Little Buffalo) of  Bad River Band of Lake Superior says he started harvesting as a young person.  “I was probably 10 or 11 when I went out harvesting with my cousin,” he explained.  His grandma, aunties and uncles taught him how to harvest manoomin.

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Youth stirring wild rice (Photo Credit: Virginia Loon)

As part of his identity as Anishinaabe, he said, “Harvesting connects everything in creation.”   He remembers important virtues such as patience, respect and love.

“Harvesting wild rice is a lot of work, but necessary,” said Jennings.  “It makes us hard and honest workers when we remember how to do things the old way. It also helps to keep us grounded and humble.”

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Karli Zschogner, journalism trainer stirring wild rice (Photo Credit: Jazlyn Copenance)

Jennings said he enjoyed the dialogue between the young people and elders. “It was invaluable to hear the experiences of the elders and the way they used to harvest and live.”

He said he enjoyed being in the community and sharing his knowledge. He was happy that Shawendaasowin invited him.  “The community is truly blessed with so many great teachers, young people and knowledgeable elders,” said Jennings.

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Elder Evelyn Tom scraping deer hide (Photo Credit: Virginia Loon)

The cultural camp involved people from in and out of the community, including students from Kenora’s Beaver Brae Secondary School.

Other cultural workshop activities included community art, tikinagan baby carrier making, deer harvesting and hide scraping, ribbon skirt making and soapstone carving. Daily feasts followed.  A traditional powwow closed the event.

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Young participants take part in soapstone carving (Photo Credit: Brayden Nash)

Carmen Bird, or Giizhibabenacesiik of the Sturgeon Clan, is Director of Services for Shawendaasowin Child and Family Services. “We don’t usually see cultural activity event opportunities in our community, so this is one of the things we were able to bring forward because of funding that we have received,” she said.

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The smiles of generations with Carmen Bird (right) (Photo Credit: Ocean Sky Tom)

The idea for this cultural camp came from the Jordan’s Principle Initiative. Jordan River Anderson was a young Cree boy from Norway House, Manitoba who didn’t get the service that he required and he had to be away from home to receive medical care.  He had to stay in a hospital, and while there, he passed away while the provincial and federal governments argued over who should take responsibility for his costs and didn’t speed up any process for him to be at home where he should have been.

Scraping deer hide (Photo Credit: Jazlyn Copenance)
Scraping deer hide (Photo Credit: Jazlyn Copenance)

Funding from Jordan’s Principle is to provide students, youth and children access to required services at home. The cultural camp fell into this category.

Bird believes it is important to retain cultural teachings and traditions from elders within the community.  “We can come together once in a while with educators, our skilled people, the ones who have talents, our organizations and our elders.”

She said Shawendaasowin plans to host future cultural camps.

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Cultural Camp Pow Wow (Photo Credit: Roland White)